Banganga Crematorium Redevelopment Competition by S|BAU / Suprio Bhattacharjee

The design for the Banganga Crematorium evolves as a series of diverging paths and routes traced out on a restored site topography and affected by pre-existing conditions – such as Samadhi structures that needed to be retained, a community temple that needed to be redesigned at the exact same location within the plot,

– Suprio Bhattacharjee

LIVING WEAVE, at New Delhi, India, by S|BAU / Suprio Bhattacharjee Architecture Unit

The population of people living in slums in India, today exceeds the entire population of Britain. Slum Clearance projects as variously seen in the past have had limited success with incongruous built environments imposed

LIVING WEAVE, at New Delhi, India, by S|BAU / Suprio Bhattacharjee

Keshopur Wetland Centre at Gurdaspur, Punjab, India, by S|BAU / Suprio Bhattacharjee Architecture Unit

The Interpretation Centre is situated amidst a wetland. A key idea at the heart of the project was the restoration of the landscape of the site to its prior state as a wetland, similar to that of the surrounding landscape, rather than have the state of imposed artificiality to which it had been consigned. – Suprio Bhattacharjee Architecture Unit

Anti Practice: The Realm of the What-Could-Have-Been (and what can still be, elsewhere) – Suprio Bhattacharjee

In many ways, a project remains unbuilt because most of the time it has challenged the normative, the status quo, the acceptability of ‘populist taste’. This is what a reading of history tells us – and why this is important as it inspires future generations of architects to be edgy and provocative. – Suprio Bhattacharjee